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We Are Cities Action Agenda Released!

Here it is, the We Are Cities Action Agenda! Thanks for standing up for your cities, Canada!

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WAC DAY: Thank you Canada for standing up for your cities

 

Thank you, Canada! You heard the We Are Cities call to action and responded by standing up for your cities.

On October 8th we hosted We Are Cities Day with conversations taking place in over ten cities across the country: Calgary, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa, Saskatoon, St. John’s, Toronto and Trois Rivieres. The core question we were asking: did we hear you correctly?! Based on all of the content gathered to date – from dozens of roundtables, online and from key stakeholders – we designed a process for you to help us further define what our cities need.  Thanks to everyone who participated in WAC Day and our first set of roundtables, we’re distilling your feedback now and drafting the Cities Action Agenda.

In the meantime, we wanted to share a little of what we heard. Out of the 5 Big Opportunities that We Are Cities articulated, Power and Revenue seemed to resonate the most. From transforming community engagement, to increased Federal expenditures on transit, housing and public space, we got lots of great feedback. And it seems like not only did we hear you correctly but we’ve also sparked a different kind of conversation – a conversation now taking place nationally, city to city and of course locally.

On WAC Day in particular the conversations were not limited to local roundtables. We also connected coast to coast on Twitter. National Tweet-ups were hosted in both English and in French and in total the hashtag #WACDay had 765 Tweets and 190 contributors.

Here’s a sampling of what people had to say about the Big Opportunities:

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About Local Challenges:

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And testaments to the campaign:

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The We Are Cities campaign was a great success. 75 roundtables were hosted in 33 cities and WAC engaged over 2,500 people. None of this would have been possible without the help of our partners, convenors, roundtable hosts and participants. So THANK YOU ALL! And stay tuned for the release of the We Are Cities Action Agenda in the coming months.

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We Are Cities Day

We Are Cities Day October 8th

We Are Cities Day will be an opportunity to re-connect with people in your city. Through a two-hour roundtable, you’ll have the chance to provide us with feedback on the framework we’re developing based on the ideas generated over the past months – it will also be a chance to deepen the We Are Cities network in your local community.  

Mark October 8th in your calendar and start planning to attend or host a roundtable that day. We Are Cities Day is a chance to show all of Canada that our cities matter. 

 

Thanks again for all your support. 

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Youth Voice in Urban Development

By: Adesuwa Ero, International Institute for Sustainable Development

Given Canada’s growing urban population, sustainable development of our cities is critical to our country’s future.  Youth across the country are being engaged in conversations concerning their visions of the future of their cities. The importance of youth voice in shaping development is invaluable for promoting a holistic agenda in policy making and development for the future users of these urban environmentals. It is a transition from doing something for youth and their cities to working with youth.

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A Winnipeg Leaders’ Panel Discussion

Panelists

  • Jino Distasio – Director, Institute of Urban Studies, University of Winnipeg
  • Robert Falcon Ouellette – Former Winnipeg Mayoral Candidate, Current Federal Liberal Candidate for Winnipeg Center
  • Judy Wasylycia-Leis – Former Winnipeg Mayoral Candidate, Manitoba cabinet minister from 1986 to 1988, and member of the Canadian House of Commons from 1997 to 2010
  • Dave Angus – President and CEO of the Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce

Moderator – Kristin Annable – Winnipeg Free Press

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Winnipeg Youth Roundtable

By: Adesuwa Ero, Intern, International Institute for Sustainable Development 

We cannot always build the future for our children, but we can build our children for the future” Franklin D. Roosevelt.”  Clearly defining and addressing the issues that affect today’s youths is extremely crucial to building more inclusive cities and fostering sustainable development because they are a significant sect of the city’s population and leaders of tomorrow.

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Table Ronde à Laval

Nous étions fières d’organiser une table ronde à Laval, plus particulièrement dans le quartier Pont-Viau. C’était une première dans cette ville! Il nous importait que les La vallois soient représentés dans cette immense campagne... après tout, la ville est actuellement en pleine ébullition! Les participants aussi, d’ailleurs.

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Brandon’s Community Gardens – A Drive towards Urban Development

By: Adesuwa Ero, Intern, International Institute for Sustainable Development

The importance of community gardens are many and varied, fostering sustainable healthy communities and urban development. Cutting across a wide spectrum of things, studies have proven that community gardens promote physical, socio-economic and environmental benefits to man.  A way of life successfully adopted by Brandon since the year 2000, and has had far reaching positive implications for its communities and the city at large.

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Ajax & Pickering Are Standing Up for the Cities they Want

By: Georgia Luyt, Community Developer at Community Development Council of Durham

While Ajax and Pickering are closely linked to Toronto, they have their own unique set of strengths, challenges, goals and setbacks. This roundtable helped explore what civic leaders and urban thinkers want for their future cities.

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Ma Mawi Indigenous Youth Roundtable

By: Adesuwa Ero, Intern, International Institute for Sustainable Development 

The Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre Inc an aboriginal people focused community organization conducted a 20 participant aboriginal youth roundtable discussing what they would want their city to look like in the future. There were a number of overarching issues that stood out, establishing the seemingly little things that are prevalent in the city and are not receiving adequate attention or basically being overlooked. 

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